Posts Tagged ‘Personal Insolvency’

The Vultures have landed-What do I do?

August 1, 2018

The term Vulture Fund is not new as this was the method used by Nama, IBRC, Anglo, Bank of Scotland and National Irish bank (to name a few) who used the sale of their loans books to 3rd parties to clear up their under performing loans.

These Vulture Funds or Investment Funds as they prefer to be called, have bought these bad loans from the main banks at a substantial discount and their only mission is to recover as much as possible from the debts they have bought. Given that both PTSB and Ulster bank announced earlier this year that they will sell circa 25,000 loans to Vulture Funds; this is already a hot topic in 2018 with demonstrators gathered outside the Ideal Homes Exhibition at the RDS on Saturday 21st April 2018 to protest the event’s main sponsors Permanent TSB.

This sale of loans by PTSB has now come to fruition by todays announcement that PTSB has sold 10,000 loans to an investment fund managed by Start. The portfolio contains around 10,700 non-performing loans, 7,400 of which are owner-occupier mortgages.

I think that no more than the IMF 10 years ago the advent of Vulture Funds entering our financial system is a wake up call that the years of kicking the can down the road by the Irish banks is now over.

Unlike the main Irish banks these vulture funds are not concerned with the negative publicity of pursuing these debts through any means possible. This could be through debt collection agencies, legal proceedings, home repossession and general harassment from their arrears support teams.

The Vulture Funds business model is short-term, they have no interest in having a long-term arrangement or relationship with their new customer. They just want cash!!!

Where does this leave the hundred thousand plus home owners who are in fear of losing their homes…….it leaves them in a tough spot.

Despite the fact that debt solutions were introduced by the Government in 2012 through the personal insolvency legislation less than 2,000 people have availed of the legislation.

The main reason in my experience is that they don’t understand that this solution applies to them and that it can help them. There is a lot of misinformation (I call it pub talk) about the legislation but from my hands on experience there is no other method to resolving your debt than by getting Court protection to save your home through a Personal Insolvency Arrangement (PIA) or a Debt Settlement Arrangement (DSA).

The good news is that 90% of those that avail of the personal insolvency legislation through a PIA retain their family home and at the end of the process they end up with a sustainable mortgage and their other debts are written down as part of the process.

The personal insolvency legislation is the only method to protect yourself from your creditors and to protect your family home.

These arrangements are working and we have put 100’s of people through the process in the last number of years. In some cases they have already exited the process and they are out the other side and they have started to finally move on with their lives.

There is not a specific profile of an insolvent person as each case is different. For example the problem could be a split loan on a family home that can never be paid, a property portfolio that will never recover, debts or judgements due to a business failure, revenue debts or residual debt left after the sale of a property or development site etc.

In my experience most of the people I meet know they are in trouble they just don’t know how to solve that problem.

I am one of less than 30 active PIPs in Ireland who specialise in the Personal Insolvency Legislation. I would recommend that you contact an active PIP to see how the personal insolvency legislation can help you to resolve your debt problems. The first question I would ask your PIP is how many cases they manage and how many cases they have gotten approved.

If you are struggling to manage your debts and you want to know how to get help then please click on the links below for more information on personal insolvency and on Abhaile which is the Government’s free mortgage arrears support scheme, which includes a free Personal Insolvency Practitioner consultation for those worried about their debts and under threat of repossession of their family home.

www.backontrack.ie

www.mabs.ie/en/abhaile/

Alternatively please send me an email setting out your situation to mark.ryan@quintas.ie and I will get back to you with a plan on how to solve your debt problem.

Kind Regards,

Mark Ryan, CPA,

Personal Insolvency Practitioner (PIP),

Director, Quintas

Mark Ryan is authorised by the Insolvency Service of Ireland to carry on practice as a personal insolvency practitioner.

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Tips on how to deal with your creditors.

April 20, 2015

Creditors

A lot of the time I get involved in cases at a late stage where the relationship between the borrower (debtor) and their creditors has broken down and unfortunately the creditors are in the process or have issued legal proceedings against the debtor.

Having unsustainable debt is a very difficult and stressful position to be in as it involves constant phone calls, letters and communication from the creditor as they try to get the case resolved. Thankfully with some hard work and straight talking we can get to a point that in most cases there is a solution that both parties can be agreeable to.

The single biggest flaw in the relationship between the debtor and their creditor is a lack of trust and poor communication on both sides.

In most cases the debtor knows that there is a problem but they don’t know what the solution is and are not confident to deal with the bank themselves so they stop talking and communicating their current financial position to their creditor. This only leads to the creditor becoming more aggressive in chasing the debtor which only makes the situation worse.

It is likely that the debtor has been dealing with the problem for the last 7/8 years since the economic collapse of the Irish economy and the free line of credit from the banks stopped.

My role in these cases whether as a PIP (Personal Insolvency Practitioner) or as part of a debt restructuring arrangement for my client is to act as a mediator or ‘referee’ between the parties. As I have said in most cases there is a middle ground that can be agreed on in the short term, which will then allow us over time to on a medium term plan to bring stability to the situation and take the heat out of what can have become a very fraught relationship.

The following would be a few of the tips I would recommend on how to deal with your creditors:

  1. Communicate – with your creditors at all times,
  2. Mediate – if you are unsure what to do ask a friend, parent, family member or business associate assist you in your discussions with the bank,
  3. Co-operate – this is simply understanding and following the banks protocols and providing them with the information that they have requested,
  4. Calculate – work out what you can afford to pay and spread this among your creditors,
  5. Prioritise your secured creditors, especially your family home,
  6. Be honest – if you are struggling (e.g. Out of work, sick etc) tell the bank and keep them up to date on your situation,
  7. Take notes – keep a copy of all correspondence and note what was discussed in your phone call as you may need this information at some stage in the future,
  8. Understand the ground rules – the bank want to be paid what they are owed but will work with you if they can,
  9. Educate yourself on the new personal insolvency and bankruptcy legislation – this is very important if you find that you cannot meet all of your debts as they fall due or you have unsustainable debt,
  10. Know your rights – you have rights and the bank know this so make sure you understand how you should be treated fairly by your creditor,
  11. Don’t fear the problem face up to it – be proactive rather than reactive with your financial situation,
  12. Look after your mental health – this is very important as if your health deteriorates your financial position could get worse,
  13. Don’t give up – they are plenty of solutions and options open that could solve your financial problems,
  14. Get good advice – It is critical to have the right person working on your behalf as signing up to the wrong deal will only make the situation worse,
  15. Be patient – as it can take sometime to get an agreement in place,
  16. You are not alone – unfortunately no one has been left untouched after the economic crash and there are many people in a similar position to you. One of the main reasons the new personal insolvency legislation was put in place was to ensure that anyone with unsustainable debt would have a chance at a fresh start in 5/6 years once their DSA/PIA had been completed.

Quintas are currently running open information evenings on debt resolution and if you would like to avail of a FREE 1:1 appointment with Mark Ryan the Quintas is a Personal Insolvency Practitioner (PIP) contact 021 4641400 or email info@quintas.ie

What happens to the family home if you become insolvent?

March 10, 2015

Family Home

This is probably the 1st question I get asked in my initial meeting with a client. The answer isn’t that simple as there are various options depending on the client and the debt involved.

There are a number of methods of dealing with debt on the family home but the main ways would be informal restructure through discussions with your bank under the MARP (Mortgage Arrears Resolution Programme), formal agreement under the new personal insolvency legislation or the final act which is bankruptcy. The banks must apply the conditions of MARP in all cases involving the family home.

None of the above options are to be feared but if you are unsure of your own position I would suggest that you contact someone to find out as you might find that it may not be as bad as you think.

Sometimes finding out what is the worst case scenario and then leaving it to a professional to negotiate on your behalf can instantly take the stress out of the situation.

Prior to the enacting of the new personal insolvency legislation there were only 2 options to manage the debt with a family home either you could reach an informal agreement with the bank or you couldn’t and the property was repossessed or sold and you still remained liable for any net residual debt that remained after the property

A core protection of the new personal insolvency legislation is that a PIP’s (Personal Insolvency Practitioner) role is to where possible keep a family in their home. This is one of the key protections of the legislation and there are a number of options involved which would include a write-down on the debt to a more sustainable level under a PIA (Personal Insolvency Arrangement). Any proposed write-down would be subject to agreement by the creditors at a creditors meeting.

The main disadvantage in bankruptcy as regards the family home is that all assets of the bankrupt are transferred to the OA (Official Assignee) who in turn can sell same to pay off some of the debts due to the creditors.

It is important to understand that all is not lost if you or you partner are bankrupt. Under the legislation there are a number of options where only one of the parties to the home loan is bankrupt. For example if there was positive equity in the family home the OA would look to realise their share (50%) of this equity. If the home loan is in negative equity the OA may not be interested in the loan and may accept a nominal fee to transfer their interest in the property to the spouse/partner of the bankrupt.

If both parties to the mortgage are bankrupt it becomes a little more difficult but there are still options available to the individuals. It is important to note that the OA cannot sell the family home without first obtaining permission from the High Court.

I would suggest that if you are concerned at anytime about your personal debts you should contact a PIP to see what your options are and you may find out that these options are not as bad as you though. This could result in some light at the end of the tunnel after what can only be considered as a very difficult dark period over the last 5/6 years as the economy was hammered during the economic crisis.

As the economy in Ireland starts to improve it is well time that those in personal debt get the opportunity to get themselves back on their feet and on the road to solvency.

Mark Ryan, Quintas PIP

Quintas are currently running FREE Debt Resolution Open Evenings on Wednesdays.  If you would like to make an enquiry or find out more contact us on info@quintas.ie or call 021 4641400.

Mark Ryan is authorised by the Insolvency Service of Ireland to carry on practice as a personal insolvency practitioner.

Is the new personal insolvency legislation working?

May 22, 2014

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After a slow start we are starting to see some progress with the new insolvency arrangements (DRN/DSA & PIA) and also with the changes to the bankruptcy legislation.

The Insolvency Service of Ireland (ISI) recently issued their 1st quarterly report which showed mixed results. Since the ISI began accepting applications for the new personal insolvency arrangements 7 months ago, there have only been 55 schemes of arrangement approved by creditors (DRN 44/DSA 7/PIA 4).

Although the Debt Settlement Arrangement (DSA) scheme is working, only 7 have been approved and the average write down was 77%.The DSA scheme is for those debtors with unsecured debts of more than € 20,000 in total.

The scheme that is under the microscope is the Personal Insolvency Arrangements (PIA) which deals with the write down of secured (mortgages etc.) and unsecured debts. To date there have only been 4 PIA arrangements approved and the average write down was 19%.

To date, the Courts have issued 70 protective certificates to debtors. A protective certificate protects a debtor and their assets from their creditors, while the Personal Insolvency Practitioner (PIP) formulates a proposal for a DSA or a PIA. A protective certificate remains in force for 70 days, but may be extended in certain circumstances.

A PIPs role is to act as a referee/mediator between the parties and a PIP is committed to ensuring that where possible they will assist those with unsustainable debt return to solvency over a period of 5 to 6 years. There are currently circa. 130 individuals licensed to act as PIPs in the Republic of Ireland.

Since the ISI went live on the 9th September 2013 there has been over 500 new applications for a scheme of arrangement (DRN 82/DSA 121/PIA 320), representing almost 600 individual debtors, with 50 new applications being made to the ISI on a weekly basis so this seems to be progressing well.

New Protocol being developed

The ISI have recently set up a working group to develop a protocol between debtors, creditors and practitioners to streamline the process for DSA and PIA arrangements. This working group is initially dealing with the DSA protocol which will probably bring this scheme in line with the comparable IVA scheme in the UK. The introduction of protocols for DSA’s & PIA’s should assist in increasing the number of applications being approved by creditors.

What happens in Bankruptcy?

The position in bankruptcy is that once a debtor is adjudicated as a bankrupt all debts are written off but unfortunately the debtor loses all of their assets including their share of the family home.

In December 2013 the term for bankruptcy was reduced from 12 years to 3 years. As part of the bankruptcy proceedings the Official Assignee can apply for a payments order which could result in the bankrupt individual having to make a contribution to their creditors on a monthly basis for 5 years. In my opinion this period should be brought in line with the bankruptcy term and reduced from 5 to 3 years.

As part of the recent ISI report they noted that there were 66 bankruptcy cases to the 31st March 2014. This was in excess of the number of bankruptcies which took place on an annual basis in either of 2011 (33), 2012 (35) and 2013 (58). The total debt involved in bankruptcy adjudications in the first quarter of this year was almost €136 million.

ISI Quarterly Statistics Reports & Transparency

One of the main positives to the above statistics from the ISI is the level of transparency on the new legislation and the fact that the data is in the public domain. The ISI will be reporting on a quarterly basis so we will all get to see what is happening in this space and the progress that is being made. The feeling on the ground is that the number of applications to the ISI has increased significantly in the last number of months and the process is beginning to speed up as all the various stakeholders get more familiar with the systems and the legislation.

Creditor’s responsibility to their Shareholders

It mustn’t be forgotten that the leaders within the major financial institutions have a responsibility to their shareholders to ensure that they get the best return on the loans that they have and which they will provide in the future. In the majority of cases a personal insolvency arrangement (DSA or PIA) will give a better return to the creditor than forcing a debtor into bankruptcy, as in most bankruptcy cases the creditors will get nothing.

As part of a DSA/PIA proposal a PIP will provide the creditors with a comparison of the return they will make compared to under the bankruptcy process. In all cases the new personal insolvency legislation is a better alternative to bankruptcy for both parties.

What does the future hold for the new insolvency legislation?

The experience in the UK which has similar insolvency legislation is that it will take some time for the system to be fully functional. It will take all stakeholders in the process to act in good faith for the system to work. This involves all parties to the agreements Debtors-Creditors-Courts-ISI working together.

The 2nd quarterly report by the ISI which should be published in early July 2014 will make interesting reading and I would expect a fast response from government if the DSA/PIA scheme has not improved the number of cases being approved.

Unfortunately the start of the process hasn’t been as smooth as we would have liked but there are now 55 individuals who have started on the road to solvency. There maybe a few bumps on the road over the next 5/6 years for these individuals but at last there is a chink of light at the end of the tunnel.

Regards

Mark Ryan CPA

Personal Insolvency Practitioner (PIP)

Personal Insolvency – Explore Your Options

November 27, 2013

money

The Insolvency Service of Ireland (ISI) went live the second week of September and has started accepting applications from Personal Insolvency Practitioners (PIP) on behalf of insolvent individuals.  This week RTE reported that the first personal insolvency arrangement under the new legislation has seen more than 70% of the borrower’s debt written off which will give tangible and real hope for the many thousands of Irish borrowers who have been left behind in solving their financial difficulties.

The new Personal Insolvency legislation was put in place to give those in financial difficulty an alternative to bankruptcy and to allow them find a path back to solvency.  It involves the write down or restructure of secured and unsecured debt, in an organised and transparent manner.

Its strict, it can be a bit complicated, but it is vital that a person get their insolvency agreement right as you only get one shot in your lifetime at fixing your financial problems through one of the Personal Insolvency Arrangements (DSA/PIA).

To find out if you are eligible to avail of the new legislation you will need to employ the services of a (PIP) Personal Insolvency Practitioner. A PIP is an expert in the new personal insolvency legislation, who will stand between you and your creditors, taking the calls, writing the necessary letters, negotiating with your creditors and advising you on how to get back on the road to solvency.

If you answer yes to the following questions, then a PIP maybe able to help:

  • Is your home loan or any of your other loans in arrears?
  • Are you having difficulty paying your debts as they fall due?
  • Have you cut back on your expenses but still find that your debt repayments are unmanageable?
  • Are you willing to offer complete financial disclosure to your Personal Insolvency Practitioner?
  • Can you commit to making an agreed monthly payments over the next 5/6 years if this means that you can see light at the end of the tunnel at the end of this period?
  • Do you feel that you cannot solve your financial problems yourself?

If you would like to discuss any of the above in the strictest of confidence please contact me.

Regards

Mark Ryan,

CPA, Director – Quintas

Mark is authorised to act as a Personal Insolvency Practitioner (PIP) by the Insolvency Service of Ireland

A version of this article appeared in an advertorial previously published by the Cork News.

A brief guide to Personal Insolvency and the options that are available.

June 27, 2013

In April we saw the official launch of the Insolvency Service of Ireland which included the new website www.isi.gov.ie

The ISI will help restore people who are insolvent to solvency in a fair, transparent and equitable way using one of three mechanisms.

Summary of mechanisms:

Arrangement Type of debt covered Value Duration Apply through
Debt Relief Notice (DRN) Unsecured (and secured in certain cases) Up to €20,000 3 years Approved Intermediary (AI)
Debt Settlement Arrangement (DSA) Unsecured No limit 5 years (+1) Personal Insolvency Practitioner (PIP)
Personal Insolvency Arrangement (PIA) Unsecured and secured No limit on unsecured up to €3m secured (though cap can increase if agreed) 6 years (+1) Personal Insolvency Practitioner (PIP)

Each of the new debt resolution mechanisms has its own rules and procedures but the following main rules apply to all of them:

Limits on usage

You can be involved in only one of the new mechanisms (DRN, DSA or PIA) or in the bankruptcy process at any one time. If you use one of these 4 processes, you will generally have to wait some years before applying to use another.

You may use each of the new mechanisms only once in your lifetime. (There is no such limit on bankruptcy but it would be rare for anyone to go bankrupt twice.)

Provision of information

You will have to complete a Prescribed Financial Statement, giving full and honest information about your financial circumstances. You will have to sign a Statutory Declaration to this effect. You must act in good faith and co-operate fully with the process.

You will have to give your written consent to the accessing of certain personal data held by banks and other financial institutions so that your financial situation can be verified. Government Departments and agencies will have the power to release certain information about you.

Public registers

If you use any of these new mechanisms, your name and details will be published on a register that will be accessible to the public. The success or failure of the process will also be recorded.

Reasonable Living Expenses

The ISI have published a guideline on this.  Lorcan O’Connor the Director of ISI stated at the launch –

‘A reasonable standard of living does not mean that a person should live at a luxury level but nor does it mean that people should be punished and live only at a subsistence level.  These guidelines are meant to be flexible.  They are a baseline for negotiations and discussions’

Click here to view the Guide to Reasonable Living Expenses

Click here to view the Debts Solutions Scenario Pack

When?

The ISI have indicated that Debtors will be able to apply for any of these arrangements in early July. Applications for the DSA and the PIA must be done through a Personal Insolvency Practitioner (a PIP). It is likely that MABS offices will be responsible for preparing DRN’s.

For further information or any questions on the above please contact me. 

Regards,

Mark Ryan

Mark is a Director at Quintas

The views expressed in this article are not reflective of the views or opinions held by Quintas. The material contained herein includes facts, opinions and recommendations which we neither guarantee the accuracy, completeness or timeliness of, nor do we endorse. We do not accept any liability for any act, or decision not to act, use, misuse or distribution resulting from use of this material”.